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The district of Trastevere is the most typical district of Rome full of small alleys, little streets and romantic squares, each of them has its own history and character.

TrastevereTrastevere, literally the neighbourhood “across the Tiber” on Tiber’s left bank, is a lovely recreation from the tourist-heavy historic centre. Mostly characterized by narrow, cobbled little streets, medieval-era dwellings, and its large roman and student population (American Academy in Rome and John Cabot University are placed here), Trastevere has a generous assortment of restaurants, bars, and cafés filled with vivacious locals. The neighbourhood has by tradition attracted artists, so it’s possible to find unique gifts in its boutiques and studios. Trastevere also has many hotels and inns, making it an ideal area to stay for the tourist who wants to experience a more local setting when visiting Rome.

The centre of public life in the neighbourhood is the beautiful Piazza di Santa in Trastevere, a big square outside of the Basilica of Santa in Trastevere, one of the city’s oldest churches and one of the nicest churches of Rome. It is decorated with spectacular golden mosaics both in the interior and out and rests upon the foundation of a church dating from the 3rd century. Also on the square is an ancient fountain that was restored by Carlo Fontana in the 17th century but designed by Gian Lorenzo Bernini. Around the large piazza there are numerous cafés and restaurants with outside tables, perfect for lunch, dinner, or to relax at the end of a long day.

Rome have many superb panoramic views and one of the best vista is on the Gianicolo Hill (Janiculum Hill), across the Tiber. It’s not considered one of the “Seven Hills” of Rome, but it’s certainly one of the most visited. Not even included within the ancient city walls and being one of the “Seven Hills” today most the Gianicolo is one of the preferred spots of the Romans to watch the sun rise over Rome. Here you can also look at the Tempietto of Bramante, the most evocative work of the High Renaissance in Rome.

TrastevereOther attractions in Trastevere include the church of Santa Cecilia in Trastevere, which contains some notable medieval as well as Baroque works of art; the Museo di Roma in Trastevere, which houses interesting archives of Roman civic life from the 18th and 19th centuries; and, in Piazza Trilussa, the statue of Giuseppe Gioacchino Belli, a poet who penned his works in the Roman dialect and who is particularly loved in Trastevere. On Sundays, near the end of Viale Trastevere, antique and secondhand vendors set up stalls in Porta Portese, one of Europe’s largest flea markets and among the best places to shop in Rome, especially if you don’t mind haggling.

Trastevere is connected to the right bank of Rome and the Isola Tiberina (Tiber Island) via several bridges, some of which are from ancient times. The neighborhood is also connected to public transportation via buses, tram lines (numbers 3 and 8), and the rail station Stazione Trastevere, where travellers can catch a train to Fiumicino Airport, Termini (Rome’s central train station), and other points in the Lazio region, such as Civitavecchia and Lago di Bracciano.

The most attractive and important streets square and monuments of Trastevere in Rome: Piazza Santa in Trastevere – Trastevere Rome This is one of the most gorgeous squares of Rome, honoured by painters and poets. Its name comes from the basilica Santa in Trastevere. The fountain in the centre was built in 1692 by Carlo Fontana but designed by Gian Lorenzo Bernini. The Basilica; it is considered by the most as the first Christian temple of Rome, but fonts are not sure. It is however certain that it has been the first one in Trastevere. It is located on the Taberna meritorious, area donated by Alessandro Severo to the Christians, after the claiming of the miraculous outflows of the “fons olei” source. Callisto Ihas been conventionally considered the founder, for this reason the church is the first one in Rome dedicated to the Virgin Mary. Giulio I° completed it in the year 352 A.D. and Innocenzo II° almost fully rebuilt it in the XII Century, mostly with marbles and travertine stones removed by the Baths of Caracalla. The church, besides several renovation works during the centuries, has been almost unchanged since Innocenzo II°. The inside, full of mosaics and art pieces, hosts burial places of illustrious people, such as Roberto Altemps of Gallese, Cardinals Osio and Alençon and Cardinal Armellini. On a step of the main altar, a mark is revealing the original spot where the “fons olei source” spurt out. As the story goes, this source sprung oil for one day and one night. This episode constitutes the origin of the basilica because later in the years the Christians saw it as an early warning of the coming of Jesus Christ, asking the emperor the “Taberna Meritoria” in order to transform it in the actual church. A less exotic explanation of the oil source fact is that it was neither oil nor petrol that sprung out, but Alsietina water (from the Alsietina aqueduct, which fed the Naumachia, the basin for naval battles of the emperor); this water, gurgling out from some leakage, was “oiled” (from latin “oletare”= to be polluted) and therefore not drinkable.

From verb “oletare” the name “fons olidus”, successively corrupted in “fons olei”. Piazza dei Mercanti – Trastevere Rome The name of this square comes from merchants, smugglers, ship-owners and traders who met here to deal with freights and sales. This square is directly connected with the dock of “Ripa Grande”. Piazza San Calisto – Trastevere Rome The name of this square comes from the church. Pope Calisto I, here, suffered his martyrdom. S. Calisto. This church was built on the house where San Calisto passed his time praying. He was killed by Alessandro Severo during the persecutions time and was threw out of the window and drowned into a well. Paolo V gift the cloister to the Benedectins from Cassino. Between 1610 and 1612 both the church and the cloister were rebuilt according to the drawings of Orazio Torriani. The buildings were damaged during the french occupation between 1798 and 1851 and a lot of documents disappeared. Piazza Santa Cecilia – Trastevere Rome The patriarchal basilica, built in honour of the martyr Santa Cecilia. At the n.30 you can see the “Osteria del Vecchio”, so called because of its first owner who died at the age of 108 (vecchio is “old”). There is at n.19, in this square a medieval house, maybe part of a bigger and fortified housing scheme with a fortified tower. S.Cecilia. As the story goes, the famous basilica of the Fifth Century was built on the house of the martyr Santa Cecilia. According to the last excavations of 1892-1902, a Roman house became visible but this is not sure. Pasquale I rebuilt it and added a big monastery. Into the church it’s possible to look at the calidarium where Santa Cecilia suffered three days before dying and the cantharus, in which the believers wet their fingers before entering the church (it’s for this reason that we still have this custom). Piazza San Cosimato – Trastevere Rome “Cosimato” is the popular name of Cosma and both the square and the street took their name from the church of Ss.Cosma and Damiano, known as S.Cosimato. In the past this place was called “prato”, field, maybe because there were no buildings here. Nowadays a little and noisy market gives life to this square Via dei Fienaroli – Trastevere Rome The name “Fienaroli” means those who pick the hay and the name of this street come from these people that lived and sold their product here. A lot of Roman ruins, which date back to the Imperial Age, were found in this place. Via dell’Arco di San calisto – Trastevere Rome The arch took the name from the church of S. Calisto and gave it to the street.

The district of Trastevere is the most typical district of Rome full of small alleys, little streets and romantic squares, each of them has its own history and character.

Trastevere, literally means the neighbourhood “across the Tiber” on Tiber’s left bank, is a lovely recreation from the tourist-heavy historic centre. Mostly characterized by narrow, cobbled little streets, medieval-era dwellings, and its large roman and student population (American Academy in Rome and John Cabot University are placed here), Trastevere has an generous assortment of restaurants, bars, and cafés filled with vivacious locals. The neighbourhood has by tradition attracted artists, so it’s possible to find unique gifts in its boutiques and studios. Trastevere also has many Hotels and Inn, making it an ideal area to stay for the tourist who wants to experience a more local setting when visiting Rome.

The centre of public life in the neighbourhood is the beautiful Piazza di Santa in Trastevere, a big square outside of the Basilica of Santa in Trastevere, one of the city’s oldest churches and one of the nicest churches of Rome. It is decorated with spectacular golden mosaics both in the interior and out and rests upon the foundation of a church dating from the 3rd century. Also on the square is an ancient fountain that was restored by Carlo Fontana in the 17th century but designed by Gian Lorenzo Bernini. Around the large piazza there are numerous cafés and restaurants with outside tables, perfect for lunch, dinner, or to relax at the end of a long day.

Rome have many superb panoramic views and one of the best vista is on the Gianicolo Hill (Janiculum Hill), across the Tiber. It’s not considered one of the “Seven Hills” of Rome, but it’s certainly one of the most visited. Not even included within the ancient city walls and being one of the “Seven Hills” today most the Gianicolo is one of the preferred spots of the Romans to watch the sun rise over Rome. Here you can also look at the Tempietto of Bramante, the most evocative work of the High Renaissance in Rome.

Other attractions in Trastevere include the church of Santa Cecilia in Trastevere, which contains some notable medieval as well as Baroque works of art; the Museo di Roma in Trastevere, which houses interesting archives of Roman civic life from the 18th and 19th centuries; and, in Piazza Trilussa, the statue of Giuseppe Gioacchino Belli, a poet who penned his works in the Roman dialect and who is particularly loved in Trastevere. On Sundays, near the end of Viale Trastevere, antique and second-hand vendors set up stalls in Porta Portese, one of Europe’s largest flea markets and among the best places to shop in Rome, especially if you don’t mind haggling.

Trastevere is connected to the right bank of Rome and the Isola Tiberina (Tiber Island) via several bridges, some of which are from ancient times. The neighborhood is also connected to public transportation via buses, tram lines (numbers 3 and 8), and the rail station Stazione Trastevere, where travellers can catch a train to Fiumicino Airport, Termini (Rome’s central train station), and other points in the Lazio region, such as Civitavecchia and Lago di Bracciano.